Lost in Translation

One of the more amusing aspects of living in a non-English speaking country is the often-startling messages that are translated.

As an Australian living in South Korea, the language divide is made greater by the symbols used in Korean language – completely unrecognisable to those of us only accustomed to the alphabet.  Thus, signage in Korea becomes a vitally important mechanism for visitors and expats to understand what is intended.

But perhaps not always with  the right results.  Here are a few that have tickled our fancy during our time here:

Sign 6

I’m astounded at the apparent ‘peeing’ power Korean women must have.  Despite gale force winds blowing one’s hair back, they clearly have the power to pee in the opposite direction.

Sign 8

And in case men don’t know exactly what to do in a urinal, let’s make it clear shall we?

Sign 3

According to a recent report, Japan is requesting visitors to stop with the ‘smelly’ behaviour.  Korea is one step ahead of you.  We stepped into our hotel elevator to find this sign.  Okaaay.

Sign 2

Speciality store in what exactly?  This one left us speechless.  And clueless.

Sign 10

In the same theme, we’ve no idea why we need to be cautioned against ‘lust’ in this bar. Apparently drinking lowers inhibitions.  Who knew?!

Sign 7

We better hold back on the sparkRINGwine then.

Sign 5

We were pretty impressed with the very precise opening and closing times of this bar.

Sign 9

The Koreans are fans of wearing clothing emblazoned with controversial English statements, like this one.  Yeah,, we’re pretty confident they have no idea what they’re wearing.  Or maybe they do……..

Slippery when wet

What if I don’t know how to “be slippery”?

Sign 4

I mean really, would you eat at this pancake store when even they are telling you not to waste your time?!

Sign 1

And finally, our favourite.  I was staying on the 12th floor of a Seoul hotel.  Quite frankly, I was petrified there would be a fire.

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One thought

  1. Hahah…thank you for the laughs….great reading 🙂

    On Thu, May 5, 2016 at 12:58 PM, Elliotts on the Road wrote:

    > ElliottsOnTheRoad posted: “One of the more amusing aspects of living in a > non-English speaking country is the often-startling messages that are > translated. As an Australian living in South Korea, the language divide is > made greater by the symbols used in Korean language – complete” >

    Like

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